The American Scholar by Ralph Waldo Emerson

It’s easier to let someone else do your thinking for you. We get lazy and say, “Don’t bother me with the details, just give me the bottom line”, and our age of fast information in the palm of our hand shortens our already limited attention span.

Ironically, we long for depth in our lives but content ourselves in shallow water. Our entertainment is banal and our conversations increasingly require a smaller and smaller vocabulary. We each have the same twenty-four hours available in every day, but many of them are lived half heartedly – nothing special.

Same old, same old.

In The American Scholar, Emerson calls us out of the fog, and desc1533913_589691241109619_1963908092_nribes what he calls “Man Thinking”. America was only sixty years old when he spoke those words in 1837, and we were still wrapped up in a parochial European mindset. He challenged his hearers to wake up and live their lives with depth and purpose.

That message has never been more relevant.

 

John 1: 1-5

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God. All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made. In him was life; and the life was the light of men. And the light shineth in darkness; and the darkness comprehended it not.

What do you think?

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