Prayer

Prayer the Churches banquet, Angels age,
Gods breath in man returning to his birth,
The soul in paraphrase, heart in pilgrimage,
The Christian plummet sounding heav’n and earth;

Engine against th’ Almightie, sinner’s towre,
Reversed thunder, Christ-side-piercing spear,
The six daies world-transposing in an houre,
A kinde of tune, which all things heare and fear ;

Softnesse, and peace, and joy, and love, and blisse,
Exalted Manna, gladnesse of the best,
Heaven in ordinarie, man well drest,
The milkie way, the bird of Paradise,

Church-bels beyond the stars heard, the souls bloud,
The land of spices, something understood.

Prayer by George Herbert


Continue reading “Prayer”

The Pilgrimage

I travell’d on, seeing the hill, where lay
My expectation.
A long it was and weary way.
The gloomy cave of Desperation
I left on th’ one, and on the other side
The rock of Pride.

And so I came to fancy’s meadow strow’d
With many a flower:
Fain would I here have made abode,
But I was quicken’d by my hour.
So to care’s copse I came, and there got through
With much ado.

That led me to the wild of Passion, which
Some call the wold;
A wasted place, but sometimes rich.
Here I was robb’d of all my gold,
Save one good Angell, which a friend had ti’d
Close to my side.

At length I got unto the gladsome hill,
Where lay my hope,
Where lay my heart; and climbing still,
When I had gain’d the brow and top,
A lake of brackish waters on the ground
Was all I found.

With that abash’d and struck with many a sting
Of swarming fears,
I fell, and cry’d, Alas my King!
Can both the way and end be tears?
Yet taking heart I rose, and then perceiv’d
I was deceiv’d:

My hill was further: so I flung away,
Yet heard a crie
Just as I went, None goes that way
And lives: If that be all, said I,
After so foul a journey death is fair,
And but a chair.

The Pilgrimage by George Herbert


Continue reading “The Pilgrimage”

Easter by George Herbert

The Resurrection of Christ by Peter Paul Rubens, 1611 – 1612, Cathedral of Our Lady, Antwerp, Belgium
Rise heart; thy Lord is risen. Sing his praise
    Without delays,
    Who takes thee by the hand, that thou likewise
    With him mayst rise.
    That, as his death calcined1 thee to dust,
    His life may make thee gold, and much more just.
   
    Awake, my lute, and struggle for thy part
    With all thy art.
    The cross taught all wood to resound his name,
    Who bore the same.
    His stretched sinews taught all strings, what key
    Is best to celebrate this most high day.
   
    Consort both heart and lute, and twist a song
    Pleasant and long:
    Or since all music is but three parts vied
    And multiplied;
    O let thy blessed Spirit bear a part,
    And make up our defects with his sweet art.
   
    I got me flowers to straw thy way:
    I got me boughs off many a tree:
    But thou wast up by break of day,
    And brought’st thy sweets along with thee.
   
    The Sun arising in the East,
    Though he give light, and th’East perfume;
    If they should offer to contest
    With thy arising, they presume.
   
    Can there be any day but this,
    Though many suns to shine endeavour?
    We count three hundred, but we miss:
    There is but one, and that one ever.

Hear Malcolm Guite Read Today’s Poem

HE IS RISEN

John 3:16

For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life.


Today is Easter Sunday!  The day we celebrate is unique in history because it is the only day God the Son was raised from the dead.  For Christians, it is the Lord’s Day and we celebrate not only at Easter but on every Sunday of the year.  It represents the gift of everlasting life which is offered freely by Jesus to everyone in the world.

The Bible says in John 3:16

For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life.

We come now to an end and a beginning.  Our journey through Lent is complete and we stand with Jesus, celebrating life to the glory of God.  Jesus’ death paid for your sins and by grace gives you right standing with God.  His resurrection is the promise of your complete restoration for eternity.

Writing in The Word in the Wilderness, Malcom Guite says:

We have been travelling together in this book through forty eight days together, but if George Herbert is right it has only been one day! From now on there is just the single, eternal day of resurrection and by its light we can look back over our long pilgrimage and see the glory of this day, hidden once, but shining now, in all we have been through.

Join the discussion on Facebook HERE

Logo

John 1:1

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.

 

 

 

 

Malcolm Guite
Malcolm Guite

Malcolm Guite is poet-priest and Chaplain of Girton College Cambridge, but he often travels round Great Britain, and to North America, to give lectures, concerts and poetry readings.  For more details of these and other engagements go to his Events Page. You can read more about him on this Interviews Page

He is the author of numerous books including

Parable and Paradox: Sonnets on the Sayings of Jesus and Other Poems Canterbury Press 2016

Waiting on the Word; a poem a day for Advent, Christmas and Epiphany Canterbury Press 2015

The Singing Bowl Canterbury Press 2013

Sounding the Seasons Canterbury Press 2012

Faith Hope and Poetry  Ashgate  2010 and 2012.

What Do Christians Believe?  Granta 2006

Photo courtesy of Lancia Smith.